Code Review

March 9, 2020

Solving Problems Collaboratively Through Code Review

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash This is the third in a series of guest posts by Andrew Tate, a writer turned software developer at Animalz.
Lyal Avery headshot

February 19, 2020

Learning security one code review at a time

Photo by Philipp Katzenberger on Unsplash This is the second in a series of guest posts by Andrew Tate, a writer turned software developer at Animalz.
Lyal Avery headshot

February 2, 2020

How Lyft Does Code Review

With its liberal use of pink, signature moustaches and Undercover Lyft video series, Lyft has always branded itself as the fun-loving and friendly rideshare service.
Lyal Avery headshot

January 6, 2020

3 Lessons Learned from My First Week of Code Review

Photo by Jefferson Santos on Unsplash on Unsplash This is the first in a series of guest posts by Andrew Tate, a writer turned software developer at Animalz.
Lyal Avery headshot

November 27, 2019

3 Ways That Remote Teams Make Code Review Work Across Multiple Timezones

images/brooke-cagle-unsplash.jpg
Photo by Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

“A code review is a synchronization point among different team members and thus has the potential to block progress,” wrote Palantir engineer Robert Fink on their engineering blog. Code review can become a bottleneck if it doesn’t happen promptly—at Palantir, “on the order of hours, not days”—that prevents code from shipping.

That’s what makes code review such a challenge for remote teams, especially those split across multiple timezones. Remote teams tend to rely on asynchronous communication and workflows, because team members aren’t necessarily online at the same time. They often need to design for the inability of reviewers to promptly unblock fellow engineers by providing a code review.

We talked with several remote teams, and they shared with us three lessons that they learned in designing code review processes that work for teams with minimal or no timezone overlap at all.

Lyal Avery headshot